The Obama Woes

helping handsI’ve been reading the woes of the Obamas and it’s a good thing I wasn’t drinking coffee or my screen would have been splattered.  You’ve got to be kidding.

Michelle Obama was at Target — dressed like everybody else — and someone asked her to get something off the shelf and that was an act of racism?  Well who would have known?  I mean, shorter people and wheel chair bound individuals have often asked me to help them out by getting an item off a shelf that was out of their reach.  I never knew that meant they were treating me like the help or that they were racists in disguise, instead of just regular people asking for a friendly helping hand .

I’ve also been asked if I worked in various places, where I was likewise a customer.  I didn’t know, until I read the woes of the Obamas that I was being insulted.  Now I know.  Well, not really.

Listening to the Obamas, it is verified that some simply look at the entire world and all things that happen to them (and everyone else) through the eyes of race.  Everything must be due to racism — can’t ever be anything else.  And yet these people cry racism and/or race insensitivity when speaking of others?  I think some have thin skins no matter what shade those skins may be.

Helping someone by getting something off a shelf is being treated like the help?  Heaven help the Obamas if they think their examples represent actual racism or that they were being treated like the help.  It’s called life among people and helping out when one can.  It’s called being part of the “human race“.

New hope for motel kids

moving kids from motel 1Just blocks from “The Happiest Place on Earth,” in one of the richest counties in America, Demond, Ashley, and their four kids have been living in a cramped, run-down motel room for a year and a half. Between the six of them, they share one bed and one small couch. Surprisingly, they aren’t welfare cases; Demond and Ashley both work full-time at Walmart. But like thousands of other families in Orange County alone, they struggle to save enough to pay the first-month/last-month/security deposit that landlords require. And so they’re stuck.

“It eats up all your money so you can’t afford to move,” says Ashley, “Even if you could afford an apartment of your own, with kids, and the rent, you can’t save any money to do anything except stay here.” To compound the problem, Ashley’s mom had an eviction when Ashley was living with her – a fact that shows up on Ashley’s credit history. So Demond and Ashley pay $1300 a month for the dubious privilege of living in a single motel room where the kids aren’t even allowed by the management to play in the parking lot. For Christmas, they’d like nothing more than to get out of the motel and into a stable home.  (Continue Reading)

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New hope for motel kids